Prove (or improve) Your Vocabulary Percentage

What’s your vocabulary score? This is a different quiz than the last one I brought to you. If you take this one, please share your results, and also, please let me know: What is your definition of vocabulary?

I started poking around online and looking at articles about vocabulary. I discovered articles from teachers and state learning institutions that tout the importance of having a good or as some called it, a wide vocabulary. I found other sites that suggest the best way to improve your life – get a raise or even a better job – is to raise your vocabulary. I even uncovered several sites willing to relieve you of your money to provide you with a vocabulary improvement course. Spend money to make money? Maybe.

Many dictionaries define Vocabulary as “the words of a language.” The American Heritage Dictionary – the online version as well as hardback, New College Edition (a relic from my high school days) and the Fourth Edition, richly illustrated in full color – takes the definition one step further. Their definition includes “knowing.” I agree. It isn’t enough to be able to pronounce a word, or speak a word; the true test is having an understanding, a knowing, of the word.

I’ll give you a personal example. My mother is Japanese. As a child, for four years, I lived and went to school in Japan, where I studied Japanese culture, dance and language. I learned two of the three Japanese alphabets – Hiragana and Katakana. Later, in college, I took Japanese and the five-hour A helped my GPA a lot. Today, when my mother does karaoke, I can sing along because I’m able to read most of the words…but I can’t say that I “know” them. My Japanese vocabulary is limited.

My English vocabulary? I continue to strive to improve it. Thus, I found another online vocabulary game at Dynamo Dictionary. I hope you’ll take the challenge. I admit, taking these mini-tests boosts my confidence. Offers me a few giggles and that little “atta-girl” when I’m trying to push the cobwebs from my brain and write.

Happy Writing!

(image creator for photo Danilo Rizzuti)

About Linda Joyce

Award-winning writer and author Linda Joyce has deep southern roots intertwined with her Japanese heritage. She was born in Mississippi, though she considers New Orleans home. She has lived coast to coast in the United States and spent four years in Japan. She married her college sweetheart and now lives in Atlanta with her husband and three dogs: General Beauregard, Gentleman Jack, and Masterpiece Renoir. (Beau, Jack, and Reni.) She’s still trying to convince “the boys” that they are her pets, and not the other way around. Beau in particular is not buying it. She loves boiled peanuts, sushi, and grits. She and her husband share a passion for college football. Linda is a member of Romance Writers of America, Georgia Romance Writers, Atlanta Writer’s Club, and several other writing groups.
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4 Responses to Prove (or improve) Your Vocabulary Percentage

  1. Janey Goude says:

    Not sure how to report my score on this one, but I missed one. Second guessed myself – that thing I tell my children never to do :-)

    Fun to exercise my brain this way. My husband is a word and number phenom, so I depend on “atta girls” from these kinds of tests to feel marginally competent!

    Thanks for the smile.

    • Linda Joyce says:

      Janey,

      Thank you for visiting with me. Living with a word and number phenom, (very coold, by the way) doesn’t diminish another’s talent, as you saw- you only missed one! I’m betting you take a more intuitive and thoughtful approach to life. *smiles* I’m horrible at Trivial Pursuit- I always second guess myself. We give our children the benefit of our wisdom, though through it all, we’re only human.
      I have another test coming soon…maybe tomorrow…about left and right brain distinctions.
      Smiles,
      Linda Joyce

      • Janey Goude says:

        Thanks for the encouragement.
        I had to smile at your upcoming test. I’ve always had trouble with right and left. I was scared I’d fail my driving test because I’d turn right when they told me to turn left.
        “Your other right” is a common refrain around our house. Our sixteen-year-old daughter inherited that chromosome. In stark contrast, her seven-year-old brother has had it down cold since he was five! He’s his daddy made over.
        I’ll try to remember to check back for the new test!

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